/[pcre]/code/trunk/README
ViewVC logotype

Diff of /code/trunk/README

Parent Directory Parent Directory | Revision Log Revision Log | View Patch Patch

revision 138 by ph10, Thu Mar 29 15:20:15 2007 UTC revision 260 by ph10, Thu Sep 20 10:19:16 2007 UTC
# Line 103  Building PCRE on non-Unix systems Line 103  Building PCRE on non-Unix systems
103    
104  For a non-Unix system, please read the comments in the file NON-UNIX-USE,  For a non-Unix system, please read the comments in the file NON-UNIX-USE,
105  though if your system supports the use of "configure" and "make" you may be  though if your system supports the use of "configure" and "make" you may be
106  able to build PCRE in the same way as for Unix-like systems.  able to build PCRE in the same way as for Unix-like systems. PCRE can also be
107    configured in many platform environments using the GUI facility of CMake's
108    CMakeSetup. It creates Makefiles, solution files, etc.
109    
110  PCRE has been compiled on many different operating systems. It should be  PCRE has been compiled on many different operating systems. It should be
111  straightforward to build PCRE on any system that has a Standard C compiler and  straightforward to build PCRE on any system that has a Standard C compiler and
# Line 116  Building PCRE on Unix-like systems Line 118  Building PCRE on Unix-like systems
118  If you are using HP's ANSI C++ compiler (aCC), please see the special note  If you are using HP's ANSI C++ compiler (aCC), please see the special note
119  in the section entitled "Using HP's ANSI C++ compiler (aCC)" below.  in the section entitled "Using HP's ANSI C++ compiler (aCC)" below.
120    
121    The following instructions assume the use of the widely used "configure, make,
122    make install" process. There is also some experimental support for "cmake" in
123    the PCRE distribution, but it is incomplete and not documented. However, if you
124    are a "cmake" user, you might want to try it.
125    
126  To build PCRE on a Unix-like system, first run the "configure" command from the  To build PCRE on a Unix-like system, first run the "configure" command from the
127  PCRE distribution directory, with your current directory set to the directory  PCRE distribution directory, with your current directory set to the directory
128  where you want the files to be created. This command is a standard GNU  where you want the files to be created. This command is a standard GNU
# Line 164  library. You can read more about them in Line 171  library. You can read more about them in
171    supported.    supported.
172    
173  . You can build PCRE to recognize either CR or LF or the sequence CRLF or any  . You can build PCRE to recognize either CR or LF or the sequence CRLF or any
174    of the Unicode newline sequences as indicating the end of a line. Whatever    of the preceding, or any of the Unicode newline sequences as indicating the
175    you specify at build time is the default; the caller of PCRE can change the    end of a line. Whatever you specify at build time is the default; the caller
176    selection at run time. The default newline indicator is a single LF character    of PCRE can change the selection at run time. The default newline indicator
177    (the Unix standard). You can specify the default newline indicator by adding    is a single LF character (the Unix standard). You can specify the default
178    --newline-is-cr or --newline-is-lf or --newline-is-crlf or --newline-is-any    newline indicator by adding --enable-newline-is-cr or --enable-newline-is-lf
179    to the "configure" command, respectively.    or --enable-newline-is-crlf or --enable-newline-is-anycrlf or
180      --enable-newline-is-any to the "configure" command, respectively.
181    If you specify --newline-is-cr or --newline-is-crlf, some of the standard  
182    tests will fail, because the lines in the test files end with LF. Even if    If you specify --enable-newline-is-cr or --enable-newline-is-crlf, some of
183    the files are edited to change the line endings, there are likely to be some    the standard tests will fail, because the lines in the test files end with
184    failures. With --newline-is-any, many tests should succeed, but there may be    LF. Even if the files are edited to change the line endings, there are likely
185    some failures.    to be some failures. With --enable-newline-is-anycrlf or
186      --enable-newline-is-any, many tests should succeed, but there may be some
187      failures.
188    
189    . By default, the sequence \R in a pattern matches any Unicode line ending
190      sequence. This is independent of the option specifying what PCRE considers to
191      be the end of a line (see above). However, the caller of PCRE can restrict \R
192      to match only CR, LF, or CRLF. You can make this the default by adding
193      --enable-bsr-anycrlf to the "configure" command (bsr = "backslash R").
194    
195  . When called via the POSIX interface, PCRE uses malloc() to get additional  . When called via the POSIX interface, PCRE uses malloc() to get additional
196    storage for processing capturing parentheses if there are more than 10 of    storage for processing capturing parentheses if there are more than 10 of
# Line 429  Making new tarballs Line 444  Making new tarballs
444  -------------------  -------------------
445    
446  The command "make dist" creates three PCRE tarballs, in tar.gz, tar.bz2, and  The command "make dist" creates three PCRE tarballs, in tar.gz, tar.bz2, and
447  zip formats. However, if you have modified any of the man page sources in the  zip formats. The command "make distcheck" does the same, but then does a trial
448  doc directory, you should first run the PrepareRelease script. This re-creates  build of the new distribution to ensure that it works.
449  the .txt and HTML forms of the documentation from the man pages.  
450    If you have modified any of the man page sources in the doc directory, you
451    should first run the PrepareRelease script before making a distribution. This
452    script creates the .txt and HTML forms of the documentation from the man pages.
453    
454    
455  Testing PCRE  Testing PCRE
# Line 489  is output to say why. If running this te Line 507  is output to say why. If running this te
507  in the comparison output, it means that locale is not available on your system,  in the comparison output, it means that locale is not available on your system,
508  despite being listed by "locale". This does not mean that PCRE is broken.  despite being listed by "locale". This does not mean that PCRE is broken.
509    
510    [If you are trying to run this test on Windows, you may be able to get it to
511    work by changing "fr_FR" to "french" everywhere it occurs. Alternatively, use
512    RunTest.bat. The version of RunTest.bat included with PCRE 7.4 and above uses
513    Windows versions of test 2. More info on using RunTest.bat is included in the
514    document entitled NON-UNIX-USE.]
515    
516  The fourth test checks the UTF-8 support. It is not run automatically unless  The fourth test checks the UTF-8 support. It is not run automatically unless
517  PCRE is built with UTF-8 support. To do this you must set --enable-utf8 when  PCRE is built with UTF-8 support. To do this you must set --enable-utf8 when
518  running "configure". This file can be also fed directly to the perltest script,  running "configure". This file can be also fed directly to the perltest script,
# Line 701  The distribution should contain the foll Line 725  The distribution should contain the foll
725  Philip Hazel  Philip Hazel
726  Email local part: ph10  Email local part: ph10
727  Email domain: cam.ac.uk  Email domain: cam.ac.uk
728  Last updated: 29 March 2007  Last updated: 21 September 2007

Legend:
Removed from v.138  
changed lines
  Added in v.260

  ViewVC Help
Powered by ViewVC 1.1.5